Posts tagged ‘Open Source’

September 2nd, 2013

Floss Weekly Episode 261: Kaltura Open Source Video Platform with Randal Schwartz and Dan Lynch

by Zohar Babin

randal-l-schwartz-floss-weeklyOn August 14th, we were  invited to share Kaltura on episode 261 of the FLOSS Weekly Show hosted by Randal Schwartz and Dan Lynch.

You can watch the full episode on this post below, or at the official show episode page, where you can also subscribe to future shows and watch some of the awesome previously recorded shows. You can also review the episode notes on FLOSS Weekly Wiki – Episode 261.

 

If you don’t know FLOSS Weekly already, Randal’s lightning intro below explains it best. Randal does a fantastic job at bringing exciting and interesting Open Source projects to the online [Video] Radio show.

 

Short summary of what we chatted about (and you can read more at FLOSS Weekly Wiki – Episode 261) -

  • What Kaltura is and why you should care.
  • Cover history and future of the Kaltura project, from making video a first class citizen of the web to world domination!
  • The recent move of the Kaltura Server repository from closed SVN to a fully open repository on GitHub.com/kaltura/server .
  • Wikipedia + Kaltura and bringing video step closer to becoming as easy as text.
  • How to get involved with the Kaltura project, fork and contribute.
  • The upcoming Kaltura Connect 2013 conference that will take place on September 30 – October 1st in NYC.

 

To watch the full episode of FLOSS Weekly 261 – Kaltura, press play below, or visit the FLOSS Weekly episode page.

March 7th, 2013

HTML5 Based Mobile OS and the Future of Video Phone Apps

by Gal Nachshon

FirefoxOS-logo_610x385 copyIt was nine years ago, during the W3C workshop in 2004, that Mozilla Foundation and Opera Software proposed, and has been rejected for, their desire to continue and develop HTML with a focus “on developing technologies that are backwards compatible with existing browsers.”

A few months later, unwilling to budge their admirable ambition, Mozilla, Opera, and Apple began working on the evolution of HTML “under the umbrella of a new venue called the WHATWG.” In 2007, after much work and development led by WHATWG, the W3C showed signs of interest and formed a working group chartered to work on the development of what came to be HTML5 specification. By the time HTML5 became the hottest trend in application development, mobile became the hottest trend in user consumption. Therefore, it was just a question of time that the two would marry. Especially since HTML5 offers new levels of innovation for mobile developers.

As of last month, February 2013, Firefox – the web browser from the house of Mozilla – has lunched its’ first HTML5-friendly mobile OS in Europe. The low cost, sub-$100, smart phone is now presenting a new challenge to Apples dominance over the smart firefox OSphone market. The new device, ZTE-made, is built on a open Web standards meaning “that every aspect of the device – including even the phone dialer – is built as an HTML5 application.”

Firefox claims that such an approach will allow faster performance than the HTML5 typically used on Android or iOS devices “where web apps have been often seen as inferior to native apps on those platforms.” Furthermore, Firefox OS “also gives carriers the chance to customize and localize those interfaces and services – including apps – as they choose, a level of flexibility they cannot have with iOS or Android.”

All of these rich features offered by Firefox OS are achieved through its flexible base of HTML5 and web applications, and like wise is Kaltura’s. As seen on the right, a Kaltura HTML5 player smoothly fits Firefox OS display screen without augmentation and faults. It is this bed of APIs upon which the Kaltura player is based on that provides a wide range service across all operating systems such as Firefox OS, but also iOS and Android SDK alike.

Kaltura’s HTML5 full featured player, however, is one of the fastest html5 players in its class, and as a recent study indicates, web viewers start dropping if a video does not start to play within 2 seconds or less. Hence, performance is key for retaining viewer engagement, but likewise is the design.

player-load-play-time

With Kaltura’s Dynamic Embed HTML5 player, a more flexible embed call allows for  changing run-time parameters easily, set up custom callbacks, and target a given DOM element in a page. The embed will inherit CSS classes and attributes of your DOM targets for robust Responsive Web Design support (sample page). This is critical since HTML5 is integrated into so many new form factors as with the Firefox OS phone.

The use of HTML5 enables the Kaltura player, as well as Firefox OS, to have a universal and flexible reach in today’s mobile world amongst many others whom picked up on the hot trends of HTML5 combined with mobile. Based on a recent global developer survey by Kendo UI, out of 5,000 developers, 36% preferred pure HTML5 implementation for all platforms, yet right behind them, at 32% of developers prefered hybrid apps that are developed in HTML5 code wrapped in a native container per target platform. This shift toward HTML5 is not surprising for not only does it give better end-user results, it also allows rapid development of apps.

For as a result of working per platform, instead of multi-platform via HTML5, 39% of developers spend time developing the same app/feature for multiple platforms instead of generating new ones. This workflow is time costly and impractical for the end user, who therefore has to wait long periods of time for upgrades on his mobile device OS and apps. Yet  HTML5, by developing apps across all platforms, generates a unison functionality with copious and flexible options to guarantee equivocal experience on any device and encourages effective future development.

We all appreciate the flexibility, robustness, and Mozilla’s ambitions to make HTML5 a first class citizen ever since 2004. However, until the day HTML5 will become a global standard, Kaltura still aims to support the best possible experiences in all environments such as iOS, Android, alongside HTML5. Therefore, Kaltura is also building native tools for experiences that can’t normally be delivered over html5 yet due to DRM, such as and adaptive streaming on Android, in order to achieve true universal reach today.

 

January 15th, 2013

How to Create a Successful Open Source Business Model

by Zohar Babin

This post was originally published on the Computer Weekly Open Source Insider blog. It was written by myself and Dr Shay David, co-founder of the Kaltura.

open source comapnies icon v2

Open source projects are measured by the size of their developer communities, by market adoption, by the number of downloads and other such metrics; companies are measured in terms of revenue and profits.

Often, attempts at maximising profit can conflict with the interests of the community or the adoption metrics. So how can competing interests be aligned?

What makes for a successful balance that allows a commercial open source software company to thrive while serving all of its masters?

Open sourcing commercial software poses many challenges, the biggest of which revolves around the meaning of ‘FREE’. At the heart of the matter is the need to release code for free vs. protecting existing business interests, staying ahead of competition, and allowing customers to own their commercial deployments.

There are various ways to make money while developing open source software, including:

● Providing integration and support services (Acquia)
● Selling subscriptions to updates and support (Red Hat)
● Selling proprietary components to segments of the user base (Funambol)
● Selling premium plugins, applications, services and themes (Joomla, WordPress)
● Selling hosting services (i.e. Software as a Service SaaS model, adopted by companies such as Acquia, Alfresco)
● Selling the software under a commercial licence and releasing the code under an open source licence simultaneously, aka Dual licensing (MySQL).

As an example, at Kaltura we chose to maintain a combination of business models, leading with a dual licence model that is combined with a SaaS offering and an API centric architecture. Released under AGPL and a commercial licence, Kaltura has rapidly grown to be the leading media management platform on the market.

Adopting a dual licence approach enables developers and customers to adapt and modify the open source software to their needs, while the commercial licence allows companies to provide customers with the ability to keep derivatives – or to embed the software in proprietary solutions along with warranty, indemnification, and professional services. For those who need help running their system, a SaaS offering provides a set of affordable hosting services.

An open API architecture is also important. It provides platform-agnostic means for developers to create video-centric applications quickly and cost effectively. As an example, Kaltura’s community and partners program (dubbed the Kaltura Exchange), enables developers and third party vendors to play an important and valuable role in extending the Kaltura software, by building innovative solutions on top of our video platform and expanding its reach to new markets while supporting the ever-growing needs of the existing customer base.

The last few years have shown us that open systems win every time: Android, for example, now outsells the closed iOS 2.1, despite Apple’s huge early lead. Every large organisation in the world now relies on open source software for mission-critical infrastructure. By combining different open business models software vendors can do well by doing good. Gone are the days where customer retention was achieved by locking data into proprietary formats or developing secret software.

With its extreme transparency, open source forces vendors to focus on creating customer value – or risk becoming obsolete. Entering the virtuous cycle of value creation that customers are willing to pay for, rapid development that leverages the community, and quick cycles to create more value… this is the promise of good open source business models.

April 18th, 2012

Kaltura Video Platform Community Edition 5.0 Released

by Roni Cohen

After months of testing and bug crunching – thank you all who installed from SVN and reported bugs and patches! – Three weeks ago at Kaltura DevConnect, we launched the shiny new version of Kaltura CE, aka Eagle, version 5.0.

The Kaltura CE 5.0 release notes include all major new features and a list of issues that were pushed to next release.

This CE release brings the following highlights -

  1. Improved installation process.
  2. Two packages – Download Here.
  3. Testing infrastructure – the release has a built in testing infrastructure to test Kaltura server and API’s! Stay tuned as we’ll explain how to set it up and use it.
  4. A new Users Roles and Permissions model.
  5. Many new additions to the Admin Console.
  6. Improved Content Distribution module.
  7. New and improved model for Creating Kaltura Server Plugins.

Rackspace and Amazon images are coming soon!

Join the thread about migration steps and help make upgrading Kaltura easy and possible.

We recommend using CentOS 5.6 and above.

If you’d like to test Kaltura without installing CE, start your free trial here.

 

December 25th, 2011

RTMP VOD and Live Streaming Using Red5 and Kaltura CE 4

by Roni Cohen

This post assumes you have Kaltura CE4 and Red5  installed and configured for webcam recording, if you don’t read this post.

In this final video post about Kaltura CE4 and Red5 integration, we will show how to enable RTMP delivery and live streaming.

 

RTMP delivery and live streaming using Red5

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December 23rd, 2011

Webcam Recording On Kaltura CE4 Using Red5

by Roni Cohen

This post assumes you have a working Kaltura CE 4.0 server. To easily install CE4 check out “How to setup Kaltura CE 4.0 VMWare image in 15 minutes“.

Welcome to the second video tutorial in our video posts series on installing and using Kaltura CE 4.0.

In this post, we show how to use a webcam to capture video using the Kaltura Contribution Wizard in CE 4 and the open source Red5 media server. As always we try to keep the knowledge and steps as general as we can so the guide will fit any Kaltura installation (VMWare, Cloud, Install, On Prem, etc.).

Note, that different Linux distributions (Debian or Fedora) behave differently and often use different commands. While the below installation steps are the same, the specific commands may vary between distros (for example, in CentOS we use yum to install packages, while in Ubuntu the command will most likely be apt-get).

This video tutorial will guide you through installation of the Red5server and its configuration in Kaltura CE 4.0 for enabling webcam recording.

Red5 Installation and Webcam Support

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December 8th, 2011

Higher Education Video Boston User Group Meeting #2

by Zohar Babin

The second Boston Higher Ed Video User Group Meet Up took place at MIT just 2 days ago. With more than twice the number of participants from last meeting representing as many as 10 different states and 3 countries (!) – the group is growing in a very encouraging pace, an indicator to the great level of excitement around video in education.

Many thanks to our friends at MIT TechTV for hosting yet another great meetup.

The meetup opened with an introductions ”round-table” of all people attending on site and online, followed by a short presentation about where we see Video in Education today, where it might go in the near future and how we should challenge today’s technology, methodologies and usage to be more social, more engaging and reach better personal and global results, leaving the majority of the meeting to an insightful open discussion.

Few meeting highlights -

  • What the future holds? How can we challenge the ways we use video today and what can be done better? (see the presentation below)
  • Mike Williams from University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, shared their use of Google+ hangouts along with Docs for realtime collaboration. (Google+ hangouts integration seemed to be a hot topic!)
  • Various video editing tools, their pro’s and con’s and integration to management platform for more streamlined publishing. Tools that were mentioned: QuickTime XSnapZScreenflow, Camtasia Studio and Camtasia Relay (integrated with Kaltura).
  • Video creation methodologies; What is the best length of a video to keep the audience engaged? Will adding interactive layers (chapters, annotations, temporal comments) contribute to the overall viewing experience, or will it divert attention? – Read best practices creating media from: Stanford and MIT.
  • Front end video applications, “Custom YouTube”, such as Kaltura’s MediaSpace and MIT’s TechTV.
  • FERPA (Use of Student Information) tips and practices.

The presentation is available here -

Boston education video meetup   trends in education video read more »

November 30th, 2011

Adventures With Open Source ETL

by Omer Gertel

One of the greatest benefits I get from working at Kaltura, is the opportunity to work with  some of the greatest open source projects out there. I’ve written about Kaltura’s data warehouse (DWH), powering the entire analytics side of Kaltura’s products and services, and I promised I’d go into more details about the technology that makes the data crunching engine turn.

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November 28th, 2011

Open Source Business Models – Where does Kaltura fit?

by Leah and Michal

Often when we speak to both community members and potential commercial clients we get questions about our business model.

These questions range from the classic:

“If you are open source, how do you make money,” to the more skeptical, “How can you charge for any of your services or code if you are open source.”

Indeed, the open source business model landscape is complex.  The genesis of open source projects  (be they community, foundation, or privately funded) is as varied as the models that many OS companies use to monetize their code.

Kaltura is unique in that we are one of a limited set of companies who launched an open source project in parallel to a commercial business. We are also using both a dual licensing model as well as a SAAS offering to grow the commercial side of our business.  Yet, the model we are using is rooted in a tradition carved by many a famous open source company before us.

Given the amount of confusion in the market, both within the Kaltura community and among developers more generally, we started a series on Open Technology Blog to clarify the landscape of open source business models and the emerging “commercial open source” licensing model used by increasing numbers of startups.

These posts lay out the basics, but we hope you find them helpful. And if you think of other companies we should add to our categorizations, please do add in the comments!

November 20th, 2011

The New York JavaScript & HTML5 Meetup

by Zohar Babin

About 2 weeks ago, we started the NYC Monthly JavaScript & HTML5 meetup. In little less than  a week, we’ve received an overwhelming response, with of over 200 members joining. The first meetup took place this past week at the Kaltura NYC office. [Register for the next one here].

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