Posts tagged ‘HTML5’

April 17th, 2013

Plugins-Free WebRTC Based Peer 2 Peer Video Delivery – HTML5 Video

by Zohar Babin

Peer5 LogoPeer-to-peer has always been a disruptive technology, enabling new applications and high efficiency. It has become an essential building block for distributed, scalable services such as Skype, Bittorrent and more. Until today, the P2P has been absent in the rich world of the Web. Various plugins tried to fill this gap but lacked standard conformance and sometimes were even intrusive. For years, enterprises could only develop client-server systems, which have increased latency and are expensive to scale. Luckily, we now have a new P2P API which is part of the HTML5 standard — It’s called WebRTC.

According to Peer5, it won’t be long before WebRTC will transform the way we communicate online; “it’s the technological breakthrough that will enable a truly plugins-free web experience – from audio and video collaboration to recording solutions and more” says Hadar Weiss, Peer5 CTO, “so far, the missing piece in the WebRTC puzzle has been the development of the  DataChannels API, the browser feature that facilitates direct delivery of raw data between two or more users without a need for a server.”

Harnessing the power of WebRTC, Peer5 is set to bring hassle-free, peer-assisted video delivery to everyone with nothing more than a modern web browser (Currently on Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox).

By building on top the DataChannels API, Peer5’s player plugin creates a peer-assisted network where viewers seamlessly share parts of the streamed video to enhance video delivery and reduce network bandwidth.

With the Peer5 solution now a part of Kaltura’s Tech Partners Program, a cutting-edge HTML5 innovation will be available with the first live demo of WebRTC-based video delivery, exclusively for members of the Kaltura community.

Peer5 Player Screenshot

We invite you for a sneak preview of this new disruptive technology and experience the first ever plugin-free, large-scale peer-assisted streaming of video from multiple sources around the world, where all registered participants will enter the live demo together, and watch as the video plays seamlessly from multiple peers.

To join the live demo, register at: http://kaltura2013.peer5.com

March 13th, 2013

The New York HTML5 Hackfest Meetup Notes – March 2013

by Zohar Babin

Thank you for joining us last night at The NYC JavaScript & HTML5 Monthly Hackfest and for the amazing AlleyNYC for hosting us. We had a great fun (as always), and learned a lot.

For those who missed the meetup, here is a quick summary -

We’ve opened the evening with (pizza and drinks) Michael Dale, Player Framework Product Manager at Kaltura. Michael gave a presentation of the state of HTML5 video and writing a player framework, giving a walk-through of Kaltura’s HTML5 Player Framework and launching the evening into a hackfest of player plugins creation.

Following after, Costa Michailidis shared the beauty of SVG based web application design in a 5 minutes lightning talk about SGV. Judging by the exciting feedback this lightning talk received, we’ll have to followup with an in-depth SVG session in a future meetup!

We talked about HTML5 video, popcorn.js, mwEmbed, SVG and hacked on player plugins.

html5hackfest-alleynyc

March 7th, 2013

HTML5 Based Mobile OS and the Future of Video Phone Apps

by Gal Nachshon

FirefoxOS-logo_610x385 copyIt was nine years ago, during the W3C workshop in 2004, that Mozilla Foundation and Opera Software proposed, and has been rejected for, their desire to continue and develop HTML with a focus “on developing technologies that are backwards compatible with existing browsers.”

A few months later, unwilling to budge their admirable ambition, Mozilla, Opera, and Apple began working on the evolution of HTML “under the umbrella of a new venue called the WHATWG.” In 2007, after much work and development led by WHATWG, the W3C showed signs of interest and formed a working group chartered to work on the development of what came to be HTML5 specification. By the time HTML5 became the hottest trend in application development, mobile became the hottest trend in user consumption. Therefore, it was just a question of time that the two would marry. Especially since HTML5 offers new levels of innovation for mobile developers.

As of last month, February 2013, Firefox – the web browser from the house of Mozilla – has lunched its’ first HTML5-friendly mobile OS in Europe. The low cost, sub-$100, smart phone is now presenting a new challenge to Apples dominance over the smart firefox OSphone market. The new device, ZTE-made, is built on a open Web standards meaning “that every aspect of the device – including even the phone dialer – is built as an HTML5 application.”

Firefox claims that such an approach will allow faster performance than the HTML5 typically used on Android or iOS devices “where web apps have been often seen as inferior to native apps on those platforms.” Furthermore, Firefox OS “also gives carriers the chance to customize and localize those interfaces and services – including apps – as they choose, a level of flexibility they cannot have with iOS or Android.”

All of these rich features offered by Firefox OS are achieved through its flexible base of HTML5 and web applications, and like wise is Kaltura’s. As seen on the right, a Kaltura HTML5 player smoothly fits Firefox OS display screen without augmentation and faults. It is this bed of APIs upon which the Kaltura player is based on that provides a wide range service across all operating systems such as Firefox OS, but also iOS and Android SDK alike.

Kaltura’s HTML5 full featured player, however, is one of the fastest html5 players in its class, and as a recent study indicates, web viewers start dropping if a video does not start to play within 2 seconds or less. Hence, performance is key for retaining viewer engagement, but likewise is the design.

player-load-play-time

With Kaltura’s Dynamic Embed HTML5 player, a more flexible embed call allows for  changing run-time parameters easily, set up custom callbacks, and target a given DOM element in a page. The embed will inherit CSS classes and attributes of your DOM targets for robust Responsive Web Design support (sample page). This is critical since HTML5 is integrated into so many new form factors as with the Firefox OS phone.

The use of HTML5 enables the Kaltura player, as well as Firefox OS, to have a universal and flexible reach in today’s mobile world amongst many others whom picked up on the hot trends of HTML5 combined with mobile. Based on a recent global developer survey by Kendo UI, out of 5,000 developers, 36% preferred pure HTML5 implementation for all platforms, yet right behind them, at 32% of developers prefered hybrid apps that are developed in HTML5 code wrapped in a native container per target platform. This shift toward HTML5 is not surprising for not only does it give better end-user results, it also allows rapid development of apps.

For as a result of working per platform, instead of multi-platform via HTML5, 39% of developers spend time developing the same app/feature for multiple platforms instead of generating new ones. This workflow is time costly and impractical for the end user, who therefore has to wait long periods of time for upgrades on his mobile device OS and apps. Yet  HTML5, by developing apps across all platforms, generates a unison functionality with copious and flexible options to guarantee equivocal experience on any device and encourages effective future development.

We all appreciate the flexibility, robustness, and Mozilla’s ambitions to make HTML5 a first class citizen ever since 2004. However, until the day HTML5 will become a global standard, Kaltura still aims to support the best possible experiences in all environments such as iOS, Android, alongside HTML5. Therefore, Kaltura is also building native tools for experiences that can’t normally be delivered over html5 yet due to DRM, such as and adaptive streaming on Android, in order to achieve true universal reach today.

 

November 8th, 2012

Kaltura and Google Bring Enhanced Video Support to Wikipedia

by Michael Dale

Kaltura is happy to announce the deployment of a greatly enhanced video platform on the Wikimedia network of sites. Wikipedia has added support for enhanced video and audio capabilities using Kaltura’s player technology! Wikimedia sites include the English Wikipedia and the Wikimedia Commons media repository.

Wikipedia and its sister sites have enabled a new video player (using Kaltura’s HTML5 video player) with the promise of bringing free educational videos to everyone on any device in any language.

Video is an important form of information, and video based knowledge is rich and illustrative, and will add a lot to the already rich and amazing content that Wikipedia has. Kaltura is proud to have its open source technology and HTML5 video player deployed to bring video to hundreds of millions of Wikipedia users. Our mission has always been to enable any video to reach any user on any device. We have been doing this working with our educational, enterprise and media customers, transforming the way people learn, work and entertain with video.

How to post videos on Wikipedia and view them in the Kaltura player – Tutorial


After an extended beta, many infrastructure integration efforts, and review cycles, Wikimedia sites now feature the same Kaltura HTML5 player used within the Kaltura Open Source Platform. A critical feature for the foundation’s commitment to accessibility and support for many languages was multi-lingual timed text support. Leveraging the Kaltura technology, the shared media repository assets can easily be embedded into Wikimedia network of sites, while supporting captions per the local language of the wiki. This update also adds robust transcoding support, along with ingestion and delivery of Googles WebM encoded videos.

For more detailed coverage read the announcement on the Wikipedia blog.

Mentions: The Next Web, GigaOM, AllThingsDVentureBeat.

 

December 18th, 2011

How To Increase Video SEO Using In-Video Chapters Driven By Cue-Points

by Roni Cohen

In the last post in Maximizing video SEO series we discussed how to take advantage of Kaltura’s platform and to make search engines understand the videos on your site.

This post will guide you how to make search engines identify your video chapters, thus recognizing more data from your video and increasing your video SEO.

 

Increase Video SEO using Chapters

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December 9th, 2011

Webinar: Unifying the Flash and HTML5 Experiences – Is it time to go HTML5 first?

by Zohar Babin

With HTML5 approaching maturity and cross-industry implementation, and particularly in the light of Adobe’s recent announcement that they plan to stop supporting Flash for mobile devices, it is important to be ready and know where the wind blows. What should you know about HTML5 when creating media centric sites? How close are we to feature-parity with Flash?

Watch this 45 minutes webinar where our HTML5 experts take you through unifying look & feel across HTML5 and Flash, design advanced interactivity over video playback and creating more compelling and engaging video experiences. We’ll also cover the great benefits that HTML5 based video implementations will bring to Search Engine Optimization, analytics and audience measurement, and of-course the main pitfalls like content protection.

Click here to watch the webinar.

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November 20th, 2011

The New York JavaScript & HTML5 Meetup

by Zohar Babin

About 2 weeks ago, we started the NYC Monthly JavaScript & HTML5 meetup. In little less than  a week, we’ve received an overwhelming response, with of over 200 members joining. The first meetup took place this past week at the Kaltura NYC office. [Register for the next one here].

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November 12th, 2011

Adobe’s Flash Focus Change Followup – The Flex SDK

by Zohar Babin

Following this week’s announcement by Adobe to halt development of Flash for mobile browsers, the Adobe Flex product managers have just announced that they will be making significant changes in the Flex SDK -

“…we are planning to contribute the Flex SDK to an open source foundation…”
“… Flex SDK feature development will continue under a new governance model…”

The Flex SDK was Open Source for a few years now, why then this sudden need to re-structure its governance model, why now?

“In the long-term, we believe HTML5 will be the best technology for enterprise application development. We also know that, currently, Flex has clear benefits for large-scale client projects typically associated with desktop application profiles.”

“…In fact, many of the engineers and product managers who worked on Flex SDK will be moving to work on our HTML efforts. We will continue making significant contributions to open web technologies like WebKit & jQuery…”

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November 10th, 2011

Is Flash Dead? The Age Of The Plugin-Less Web

by Zohar Babin

Many may have found the latest news rocking, shocking, or maybe as a “little too late”…

In case you didn’t follow the news yesterday, Danny Winokur, VP of Interactive Development at Adobe made the following announcement:

“We will no longer continue to develop Flash Player in the browser to work with new mobile device configurations (chipset, browser, OS version, etc.) following the upcoming release of Flash Player 11.1 for Android and BlackBerry PlayBook.”

It wasn’t very surprising then to see the surge of excited commentary from the HTML and Web Standards community and disappointment felt by avid Flash developers.

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November 8th, 2011

HTML5 Video Library Update

by Zohar Babin

We’re happy to announce the deployment of version 1.5 of the Kaltura HTML5 Video Library. This  release includes a number of enhancements in the playlist handler, the addition of QUnit tests for many player features and many additional plugins. This blog post will give you a high level overview of all the changes. For more in-depth coverage follow the html5video.org wiki.

The Kaltura library update has been deployed to both .org and .com to enable html5 links provided to you by the KMC and to the html5.kaltura.org/js location. Its important that if you’re a Kaltura customer you contact your project manager or Kaltura support to update your script includes to the .com hosted version of the library. The .org location will continue to host the latest version of the library and is a good way to play around with new features, but is less recommend for production sites.

Continue reading for the full release notes on this Kaltura html5 video library update:

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