Posts tagged ‘ce’

February 16th, 2014

Introducing KIPP – Kaltura Install Made Simple.

by Jess Portnoy

kaltura-light-blue-bg

The installation of Kaltura, just like the platform itself, went through a lot of metamorphosis over the years.

Over the years, we invested many resources at making Kaltura the best media management platform. Featuring grand batch system, complex metadata engine, robust entitlements, simplified video transcoding and more.

Alas, built on many different technologies, the installation of the platform became a bit of a complex task. Requiring many pre-install steps and several tricky pit-falls, even for the expert Linux engineers.

 

Announcing “KIPP” – Kaltura’s Install Packages Project!
Putting in place the resources to simplify and standardize the installation of Kaltura.
To enable the use of standard Linux package managers (e.g. yum, aptitude) to deploy the Kaltura platform with ease.

 

Community ahead!

It was important for us to create an open and collaborative project from day 1. Enabling community users to take part in defining, testing and developing the project.

Open repository and packaging tools –

All RPM and deb specs are accessible on an open GitHub repository.
Also available a chrooted ready-to-go build environment to allow experienced package developers to get started with ease and contribute packages for other CPU architectures or other operating systems.

 

Many dependancies, many challenges.
Kaltura requires many 3rd party components. Some of which are available via official Linux repositories. Many are in different versions or compilation options than what Kaltura requires. And other are missing altogether from official repositories.

Most packages are available from supplementary repositories such as EPEL and RPMForge. But, relying on unofficial repositories would force a list of pre-install steps that KIPP was set to avoid. And it would also introduce the challenge of keeping up with updates from these repositories.

 

Clean & Simple!
To meet our simplicity goal, we’ve chosen a few project guidelines.

All packages will have the ‘kaltura-‘ prefix.
This ensures a no-conflict with other packages the machine may already have installed.
It would also provide a simple approach to handling updates –
# yum update "*kaltura*"

All files go under /opt/kaltura/.
Apart from standard init scripts: /etc/init.d and symlinks to Apache and logroate configurations. If the user runs the un-install script – everything gets removed.

Release notes matter.
Every package contains project metadata, that includes the project’s github repository and changes log. The changes-log contain all changes or patches for each version as well as links to Knowledge Center release notes.

Simple single-server without compromising cluster installs.
A single call to the ‘kaltura-server’ meta-package will install a complete all-in-one Kaltura server. But, as you grow your usage, so should your network grow into a smarter cluster of dedicated servers.

Modular packages structure.
A key characteristic of Kaltura is its ability to scale and deploy across any size cluster. The install packages should allow for the same level of modularity in deployment:

  1. You only install what you need.
  2. You should always know exactly what you have installed and of which version.
  3. You should have full control over which parts to update or patch.
  4. You should deploy packages based on desired server-role by calling its role. E.g. front, batch, sphinx, DB, etc.

Automated, silent installs.
Repurposing and adding new servers in your network should be a painless and automatic task.

Post-install script for each server role, allows for an easy deploy or repurpose of Kaltura servers.
Utilizing answers-file, preconfigured server-role templates allow for automatic deployment of new servers.
Admins can use Chef scripts with preconfigured answers-file to deploy complete clusters with ease.

Building for today, designing for long-term.
The short-term goal is to solve deployment of Kaltura on Fedora and Debian based Linux systems. Utilizing simple shell post-install scripts we maintain a common code base whenever possible. That allows for reuse in future packages, reducing time to package for other systems such BSD variants or even OSX.
Also, if we add new directives or variables in the future, all we need to update is the answer file template.

 

Support the project:

  • Kaltura Admins – Follow the new install guide (http://bit.ly/kipp-rpm). Help test the installation and upgrade flows.
  • Packagers / Package Developers – If you’re experienced with Linux packaging (or brew/macports on OSX) drop us a line!
  • Tech writers, translators and anyone who cares – Let’s reach everyone who cares about online video, anywhere!

To stay updated and learn more, visit the project page!

 

 

June 2nd, 2011

Spin Up Kaltura On Rackspace Auto-Magically

by Jason

Kaltura has an expansive and popular SaaS (Software as a Service) offering that lets our customers host and manage hundreds of thousands of videos, images, audio files, and documents. But one of our major competitive advantages is that we offer self-hosted versions of our media platform as well.

Our popular, totally free, open source Community Edition has been downloaded over 100,000 times and is hosted on sites, both large and small, around the world.

Hosting media (especially video) can be complicated, but our new partnership with Rackspace makes it easier than ever to get Kaltura’s self-hosted media platform up and running in your Rackspace Cloud account.

We’ve built upon the Rackspace Cloud Server API, so that all you have to do is submit a simple web form and an Ubuntu 10.4 Linux server with Kaltura’s Community Edition pre-installed will spin up in your Rackspace Cloud Server account.

To try out Kaltura with your Rackspace Cloud account, just put your username and API key into our handy form (you can find your API key in your Rackspace Cloud management console. Login to your Rackspace Cloud account and go to the “Your Account” tab, and then to the “API Access” tab).

Click here to get started with your Kaltura CE Image on the Rackspace cloud!

After your server spins up, you just need to take a few simple steps to finish installing Kaltura.

Kaltura on the Rackspace Cloud is a win-win partnership that adds value for all of our mutual customers.

December 1st, 2010

Live Streaming, RTMP, and Webcam Action With Red5 and CE 3

by Jason

You can check also the CE4 and Red5 integration video post series.

We’ve  done a little back room hacking over the Thanksgiving holiday to bring you a relatively easy way to add the free open source Red5 Flash Server to our Community Edition 3. The result?  Live streaming for your events, RTMP streaming for your existing videos, and our  webcam, all working with CE 3.

Your users can now record themselves via the Kaltura Contribution Wizard (KCW) webcam and those recordings can be saved, transcoded, and distributed like any other video.

RTMP streaming is available via the Kaltura Dynamic Player (KDP) for all of your videos.

You can also create multiple live streams in CE 3. A fun way to test them is to stream your webcam from your laptop using the free Adobe Flash Media Live Encoder.

Our Red5 Integration Guide has all the details!

As always, we’re looking forward to your feedback. If you found a cool way to extend this or found a bug, please share in the comments, CE forum or issues queue :-)