Archive for ‘Community Events’

July 30th, 2014

O’Reilly OSCON 2014: FOSS Nerd Field Report

by Jess Portnoy

OSCON_LOGOThe O’Reilly Open Source Convention (OSCON) took place at last week at Portland, OR. Portland is a fun city, with great restaurants and bars, and surrounded by beautiful mountain scenery.

If you’re a FOSS nerd or even just getting started with Open Source, you’ll love OSCON. Kaltura has been a proud sponsor of OSCON for the 7th year.

Community Leadership Summit.
The weekend before OSCON, we’ve attended the Community Leadership Summit, or in short CLS. CLS is a 2-day UN-Conference. The goal is to share best practices and discuss the art and science of community building and nurturing.

If you haven’t been to an un-conference before, the idea is for the attendees to come up with the agenda the morning of the event. Making a collaborative, inclusive and creative gathering. Most impressing was how quickly attendees suggested sessions, creating a packed agenda within 20 minutes.

CLS was full of great sessions and I’d like to share a couple with you –

  • The first was lead by Russ Pavlicek from Xen: “Birthing a new community within an exising community”. Community managers shared their experiences expanding their communities to new groups. For example growing a developer community out of your user community. Or fostering discussion oriented communities out of a hard-core developer group. We even discussed growing adoption and participation within a religious community with local chapters.
  • Another notable session was: ‘How to keep your marketing team happy’. The discussions made me reflect on memories of conflict I had with marketing teams of previous companies I worked at. I said I am proud to be working at Kaltura where we foster an open collaboration between the Community and Marketing teams.

Check out the videos section and the forums at the CLS website to learn more and get in touch with other community leaders.

FLOSS Community Metrics Meeting.
Then we attended the first FLOSS Community Metrics Meeting. A meeting of community managers from known FOSS groups including Puppet Labs, Debian, Red Hat and others to discuss analytics and ROI of community and participation. Zohar Babin, Kaltura’s Sr. Director of Community & Ecosystem Partnerships presented the opening talk on communicating the value of participation and community work within commercial organizations, and how to avoid getting side-tracked with the data and instead, focusing on success stories and well defined project goals.

OSCON – O’Reilly Open Source Convention.
I knew OSCON was blessed by the FOSS goddess when the projector immediately connected to my laptop! See, I work with Linux exclusively, and frequently face the “battle of the projector” before presentations.

The OSCON workshop I lead was: “Debugging LAMP Apps on Linux/UNIX Using Open Source Tools“. I’ve completely broken a Linux installation, and then spent 3 hours live debugging and fixing the environment with the attendees – That was FUN! Nothing teaches you more than breaking things.

I got to exchange a lot of Production disaster recovery experiences with my fellow attendees and discuss solutions and means to avoid the fiascos in advance.
If you’d like, check out my slides:

Tweet at @jess_port01 or @kaltura and leave a comment below if you’d like to talk about the slides.

There were a lot of interesting sessions, technical and otherwise. I strongly suggest you review the session materials on http://www.oscon.com. O’reilly also recorded the sessions, so stay tuned for the VOD soon.

One special talk I’d like to highlight was by Chris Launey of Disney. Chris spoke about the challenges of DevOps where everything is always “needed yesterday”. He discussed how people often hear about “this new cool tool” and want to deploy it right away, without expressing a clear need for it. Or whether the current system can already provide the same capabilities.

Chris also gave an example of how people say “Lets install Ubuntu!” and when asked what will it enable that their current RedHat install doesn’t – there’s no concrete answer. See his session details for more.

Michael Dale, Kaltura’s Product Director of Playback and Core delivered a session titled “HTML5 Video Part Deux; New Opportunities and New Challenges”. Michael discussed the recent developments in the HTML5 standard. And explored new video experiences the new features will enable. Review his session details for more, browse the sessions slides online and tweet at @michael_dale or @kaltura for questions and followup.

As with any conference, the ‘water cooler’ conversations are equally interesting and informative. I met many fellow hard core techies. Had conversations on GCC optimizations, low level kernel changes and many other interesting topics. That was lots of fun, long live us CS nerds!

Interesting to observe was that the FOSS ecosystem had significantly grown from the “die-hard hobbyists club” to including the average user and more new business models. Nowadays, for-profit commercial projects and non-profit community driven projects co-exist in the FOSS ecosystem. And more so than ever, feed each other and promotes growth and success. Kaltura is such an example. An open source project used by many. Built and maintained by a commercial company. And in turn both the project and company benefit in more features, faster innovation, support and advocacy.

At the Kaltura booth in the exhibit hall, I came across many interesting developers and projects. Two that I think deserve an honourable mention were:

  • Aaron Wolf’s project Snowdrift.coop. A new fundraising platform in the spirit of Free, Libre and Open.
  • The other was Jim Cupples’s Ballot Path. Jim defines himself as a “social sciences nerd”. Ballot Path is allows Oregonians to learn about their elected representatives. And shows the steps one would need to take to run for office.

Both of these projects involve open source technologies, and licensed as such. Yet both are not technical projects. FOSS is not just for techies anymore. Everyone benefits from the values and practices open source presents.
I recommend reading ‘In the Beginning was the Command Line’ by Neal Stephenson. Where Stephenson discusses the contributions of the open source principles and culture to society.

To conclude, OSCON was an informative and fun conference. And I look forward to meeting you there next year!

July 28th, 2014

Four Reasons to Start Content Marketing

by Joe Fleischmann

Tried and Tested Advice from Four Content Marketing Leaders

“Content Marketing Matters.”  Michal Tsur, Kaltura’s President and CMO said this in her introduction to the Panel Discussion about Content Marketing at Kaltura Connect 2014.  A niche of marketing once overlooked by the masses, content marketing has gradually become a part of many organizations’ marketing mixes.  Still there are organizations everywhere struggling for reason to allocate budget, staff, and time into incorporating it into their own mix.  The reality is, content marketing is something every organization in this decade must start practicing if they want to stay relevant in their user’s eyes—and it’s easier to start than you might think.

1: Content Marketing Creates Brand Loyalty 

All too often, organizations undervalue and neglect to address their customers as what they really are—people.  Scott Salik, VP of Video at Visalus—a direct selling company, illustrates how he was able to connect with his customer base.

My goal is to drive an emotional response so that people will connect with the product.  So that they feel they will have success with weight loss, or so that they feel they will have success in business. 

With this in mind, Scott and his team created a campaign to challenge his customers in achieving their weight loss goals.  If their customers could lose the first ten pounds, they would be more likely to reach their end goal.  With that in mind, Visalus launched Project 10 where customers would submit two videos—an “I want it” and an “I lost it” video showing their results.  Then, every week Visalus would select 10 people who submitted both videos to win $10,000.

 After four months, they’ve received over 100,000 clips, and noticed a 670% increase in the long term value of a customer who submitted both clips.  As Scott says, “Often they become promoters for us and help sell our product because they are true advocates for the success of our product.”

With just a bit of research and a simple internal campaign Visalus was able to increase their overall value, engage their customers, and generate hundreds of hours of user generated content they can freely use however they want.

2: Content Marketing Creates Brand Awareness  

Typically an organization creates brand awareness through advertising.  While it works, potential consumers can sometimes get frustrated and it is almost always an expensive endeavor.  Cornell University has launched a website dedicated to telling its stories called CornellCast.  As Carrie Sanzone, Web Product Manager at Cornell says:

It’s about getting that word of mouth, getting people talking about Cornell.

Carrie illustrates this with an example about 3D printing during her presentation.  Cornell can invest little into producing a story in-house and by keeping it on a central location (CornellCast), media outlets can report on it and increase the videos reach greatly.

“We’re not trying to get people to come necessarily to CornellCast.  But, we want to be where you are.  We’re trying to find the intersection of what people’s questions and problems [are], and where that intersects with our talent and expertise.”  With this methodology, spending what they typically would on advertising, they can create great content that appears to their potential students when they want to see it allowing Cornell to naturally become a part of the conversation.

3: Content Marketing Can be Measured

A struggle organizations often have in beginning content marketing is their belief that it can be difficult to see a clear return on investment.  In reality, too many organizations are focused on the wrong metrics.  Raymond Attipa, CEO of Shandy Media, a Compulsive Digital Media Company, has his own ideas of what make for quality metrics—and it’s not the number of clicks or views a video has.  For Raymond, it’s about how engaged viewers are with his content.

We have videos which are extremely successful because they have an extremely high engagement rate, an extremely high share rate and that’s really what our advertisers are looking for.  

Depending on what your goal is, in the case of Shandy Media—advertisement revenue, if you set the right goals, you can find methods to track it.  Things like duration of video watching and which countries and devices viewers are coming from, can go a long way in deciding which content to produce and promote, and where.

Of course, it’s important to remember that you only ever want at most 2-3 things for the viewer to take away—the basic marketing principles still apply when you want a viewer to act on a call to action.

4: Content Marketing Should be Applied to a B2B Space

Typically, content marketing is only referenced when talking about companies selling directly to a consumer.  The reality is that through refocusing and offering something else, it’s possible to use content marketing to effectively reach businesses.  Linda Crowe, Director of Content Marketing Programs at Oracle faces this challenge head on.  What she’s discovered is that that nature of who Oracle is selling to is changing and it’s not just those in technical positions making purchases.

Audiences don’t want to hear Speeds & Feeds

Like the first point we addressed, you’re always marketing to people.  People are who make up the businesses and it’s crucial to realize that.  Linda says it best: “They don’t want to hear about the technical attributes of our product, initially.  What they want to hear is, what are the business solutions and how are Oracle customers really approaching solving a business problem.”  What Linda is doing is starting this engaged conversation where Oracle can demonstrate solution oriented content in a manner that makes sense to those in a buying position.

If one of these four reasons isn’t enough to at least get you questioning why your organization doesn’t actively apply content marketing into your mix please let us know in the comments!  We’d love to hear your thoughts and opinions.  Also, be sure to watch the full panel discussion online—it’s full of amazing insights into the world of content marketing.   

July 23rd, 2014

What’s Next for HTML5 Video? Join our Talk at OSCON 2014

by Zohar Babin

Sharing the excitement from floor of OSCON 2014, Kaltura’s Director of Playback Experience and Video Monetization, Michael Dale talks about Kaltura, open source and his OSCON talk about what’s happening with web video standards and html5.
Be sure to visit Michael’s OSCON 2014 talk – HTML5 Video Part Deux; New Opportunities and New Challenges and come by our booth (#P1).

TF2A4144

June 24th, 2014

12 Tips to Deliver the Perfect Online Event

by Lisa Bennett

This post is written by Matthew Wainwright, Director of Marketing at Attend.com. Wainwright comes from HubSpot where he was a Principal on the Channel Marketing. Prior to that he worked on their Service team as a Senior Consultant. He has also worked at agency Catalyst Online and interned at Compete.com. He holds an MBA from Boston University.

Putting on the perfect online event can be harder than it initially seems. Here are some tips to make sure that your online events always strike the right note and meet your event objectives.

1.  Define your objectives, refine your target audience

Start by agreeing on your overriding goal for the online event. This could be lead generation, identifying potential new recruits for your business, or establishing a connection with prospective partners.

For lead generation-oriented events, it’s good to extend invitations to existing leads as well as well new prospects. This can help to shorten the sales cycle and increase close rates.

2.  Choose the right event name

Choose a compelling name for your event that takes into account heavily trafficked keywords that will boost SEO and help to increase the number of relevant people who come across it.

3.  Create a landing page

Create an online registration page, or landing page, for your event where attendees can sign up in advance. Make sure that every promotion ahead of the event links back to the landing page and that everyone who signs up gets an event confirmation.

4.  Post a call to action’ on your website

Place a ‘call to action’ on your website that promotes the event. Go light on the text and instead use images and graphics to entice website visitors to sign up for the event.

The elements of a good promotion email are: a personalized email, an interesting subject line, concise copy describing your online event, and a clear call to action, such as “Register Now,” that links people to your landing page.

5.  Promote via Social Media

Promote the event via social media such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.  Create a unique hashtag for your event on Twitter to help with promotion and for use during the online event itself.

6.  Consider paid search

If you don’t have a large enough database of contacts, consider setting up paid advertising on social networks and/or a search engine to promote you online event. If you are not visually inclined, ask a designer to help you create visual ads.

All the major search engines have paid search advertising programs that let you purchase the right to have your listing show up for a given term. Choose a relevant keyword (like “leadership webinar”), use that keyword in your ad and then link that ad to your landing page.

7.  Don’t forget about the content!

It’s easy to focus so much on the promotion and the logistics that there is little time left to work on the content. Plan the content well ahead of time and make sure you do a dress rehearsal before the event to iron out content, technical and delivery issues. The goal is to leave the attendees wanting more.

8.  Choose an engaging presenter

A well-known presenter, such as an industry thought leader, can help to pull in attendees and may not be as expensive as you think. They may also agree to present for free if you are helping them to reach a new audience. A senior executive from your organization who is skilled at presenting online, where real-time audience feedback is limited, is also a good option. You are looking for a radio talk-show host, not a standup comedian!

9.  Build a strong support team

Don’t overlook the value of securing a good team to support the presenter on the day. Choose a host/MC to oversee the event and handle Q&A, have a technical whizz on hand to handle any audio, visual and connectivity issues and consider having a social media expert ready to respond to others using your event hashtag in their discussions.

10.  Find the optimal time

The ideal time for an online event is just before lunch. Of course, this varies with the profile of your ideal attendee and the need to include people from different time zones.

11.  Follow up post-event

The actions you take immediately after your event has ended can impact its overall success. New leads need to know you have more to offer, existing leads need to be pushed into further conversations and existing customers need to know how they can use your product or service to take further action.

Create a ‘thank you’ email and short survey that can be sent out straight after the event, which includes links to the event video/slides and asks for feedback on the content and presenter. Keep the language in this communication broad enough to cover off recipients who may have left the event early, or didn’t actually join.

12.  Repurpose the content post-event

Post an on-demand version of the event on your website and continue to promote the content. Putting this behind a gate such as a landing page means that you can continue to capture residual leads.

March 5th, 2014

The Kaltura European Executive Forum: The Philips Innovation Brand

by Zohar Babin

bafta-kalturaOn Feb, 12th we hosted our first European Kaltura Executive Forum at the prestigious BAFTA venue in London.  Customers, prospects and partners attended in response to the success of Connect in New York and the subsequent request for local peer to peer networking events.

As the first of many to follow in different cities and countries, the evening made the audience the core focus.  After a brief welcome and introduction by Russ Zack, VP & GM Europe and Michal Tsur, CMO, President and Co-founder, Paul Osgood from Philips took the floor.

Paul is the Internal Communications Manager for Philips headquartered in Amsterdam.  From his first word he captivated everyone with his exuberance as he took us through short films created by employees and agencies demonstrating how video has taken internal social collaboration to the next level.  Most compelling were the video stories that employees shared with fellow colleagues spread across the globe and how Philips has made a difference to their lives and those of family and friends.

Everyone in the room had myriad questions which stimulated a distinct rethink about how the first audience for any communication is the personnel.  The remit was simple apparently, based on one single question:

Tell us how Philips delivers innovation that matters to you.

Within a few short weeks people had jumped on board and were posting their short films.  No storyboards, no scripts.  Yet here we saw firsthand how passionate and creative staff were with no formal video production skills.   Interaction was encouraged and engagement measured through views, likes and comments.  By sharing their stories the company celebrated a wave of digital camaraderie never achieved through other means of communication.

The buzz continued as Philips relaunched it’s brand purely to the global employees outside of office buildings with countdowns reminiscent of any New Years Eve midnight strike.  This time they used an agency to create a brand video mixing many of the exciting videos created by their employees (watch: Philips Innovation and You Brand Video) and launching with an dazzling video presentation on the facade of their office buildings generating a new interactive viewing experience for employees out on the streets to enjoy.  The fact that passers by and the rest of the world were welcome to join in the fun without any invitation once again showed how committed Philips is to making every individual a part of the collective, removing international and physical barriers to personnel interaction and integration.  Everyone outside of the Philips collective was quite frankly secondary to this huge rebranding campaign.

They seemed to have cracked the secret code of innovative communication and engagement using video.  There was no doubt that it was working – the results spoke for themselves and continue to do so.

At this point in the evening there was a definite buzz of excitement as we all had lightbulb moments (yes I know Philips makes lightbulbs so pardon the pun).  Further, I had the feeling that everyone in the room was actually understanding what the Philips global team already understands:  how video adds value as a social business collaboration tool.

It seemed that this new compelling insight was creating a new kind of warmth and light and what does one need when inspired and the imagination is peaked?  Cocktails and canapes of course.  In the relaxed and cosy surroundings of the venue, attendees mingled with Kalturians and each other, sharing their own stories and networking.

Paul continued to be bombarded with questions on into the late hours and his enthusiasm and wonderment at how Philips now collaborates was very contagious.  From seeing the original internal communications task at hand as a major challenge he considers himself to be a complete digital convert, embracing video.  As people started to head home and said their good-byes, they left stating that they could see the true internal business need to embrace and connect within their own organisations.  Only now they left with lots of new ideas and connections to reach out to and collaborate with.

Kaltura video case study here:  http://corp.kaltura.com/content/inspiring-creativity-philips

September 2nd, 2013

Floss Weekly Episode 261: Kaltura Open Source Video Platform with Randal Schwartz and Dan Lynch

by Zohar Babin

randal-l-schwartz-floss-weeklyOn August 14th, we were  invited to share Kaltura on episode 261 of the FLOSS Weekly Show hosted by Randal Schwartz and Dan Lynch.

You can watch the full episode on this post below, or at the official show episode page, where you can also subscribe to future shows and watch some of the awesome previously recorded shows. You can also review the episode notes on FLOSS Weekly Wiki – Episode 261.

 

If you don’t know FLOSS Weekly already, Randal’s lightning intro below explains it best. Randal does a fantastic job at bringing exciting and interesting Open Source projects to the online [Video] Radio show.

 

Short summary of what we chatted about (and you can read more at FLOSS Weekly Wiki – Episode 261) –

  • What Kaltura is and why you should care.
  • Cover history and future of the Kaltura project, from making video a first class citizen of the web to world domination!
  • The recent move of the Kaltura Server repository from closed SVN to a fully open repository on GitHub.com/kaltura/server .
  • Wikipedia + Kaltura and bringing video step closer to becoming as easy as text.
  • How to get involved with the Kaltura project, fork and contribute.
  • The upcoming Kaltura Connect 2013 conference that will take place on September 30 – October 1st in NYC.

 

To watch the full episode of FLOSS Weekly 261 – Kaltura, press play below, or visit the FLOSS Weekly episode page.

May 30th, 2013

Watch: Philips, Zappos, Oracle, Cornell, Intercall at Kaltura Video Summit 2013 (Video)

by Iddo Shai

Here at Kaltura we have been hard at work producing our next video summit. This year, our virtual conference will include two exciting days of video presentations, live Q&A and networking opportunities. Here is a sneak peek:

  • Kaltura Education Video Summit – Wednesday, June 12 2013
  • Kaltura Enterprise Video Summit – Thursday, June 13 2013

The presentations were shot in the US and across Europe with great speakers from Philips, Oracle, Zappos, Intercall, Cornell, Copenhagen Business School, Manchester Metropolitan University and many more. You can find the full agenda here. The conference will take place online and admission is completely free!

We hope to (virtually) see you at the event!

May 20th, 2013

The Stanford University School of Medicine Kaltura Video Meetup and Hackathon – May 28, 10am to 4pm

by Zohar Babin

stanford-medical-kaltura-hackWe’re really excited to invite you to our first Kaltura Education hackathon – The Stanford University School of Medicine Kaltura Video Meet-up and Hackathon.

Join the Stanford University School of Medicine and Kaltura for exciting video application hacking, learn about Kaltura in Stanford School of Medicine, build cutting-edge video applications and a chance to win awesome prizes!

 

Venue: Stanford University (3160 Porter Drive, Palo Alto, CA 94304)
Time: Tuesday, May 28, 2013 from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM (PDT)

Agenda:

10:00am – 10:30am
Meet and greet

10:30am – 11:15am
Presentation by the Web Services team of Stanford School of Medicine

  • Identifying and transferring our videos from Akamai to Kaltura
  • Analyzing our current environment and preparing for the migration
  • Updating our core video script to utilize the Kaltura Dynamic Player
  • Utilizing the Kaltura API to execute a mass update of our thumbnail images
  • Installing, customizing and configuring MediaSpace in the Stanford Medicine context

11:20am – 12:30pm
Presentation by Kaltura – The Kaltura API and “Video Expirements”

  • Building Kaltura API based Video Applications
  • Showcase of exciting education related video experiences
  • Sneak Peeks into the future of online video

12:30pm – 1:00pm
Lunch

1:00pm – 3:40pm
Hackathon: Building HTML5 Education Video Apps

3:40pm – 4pm
Hackathon Apps Showcase and Closing

 

 

Register to the event

 

 

March 13th, 2013

The New York HTML5 Hackfest Meetup Notes – March 2013

by Zohar Babin

Thank you for joining us last night at The NYC JavaScript & HTML5 Monthly Hackfest and for the amazing AlleyNYC for hosting us. We had a great fun (as always), and learned a lot.

For those who missed the meetup, here is a quick summary –

We’ve opened the evening with (pizza and drinks) Michael Dale, Player Framework Product Manager at Kaltura. Michael gave a presentation of the state of HTML5 video and writing a player framework, giving a walk-through of Kaltura’s HTML5 Player Framework and launching the evening into a hackfest of player plugins creation.

Following after, Costa Michailidis shared the beauty of SVG based web application design in a 5 minutes lightning talk about SGV. Judging by the exciting feedback this lightning talk received, we’ll have to followup with an in-depth SVG session in a future meetup!

We talked about HTML5 video, popcorn.js, mwEmbed, SVG and hacked on player plugins.

html5hackfest-alleynyc

March 9th, 2013

Creating a Social TV Experience (Video)

by Iddo Shai

sxsw-kaltura-logo-2013_Hello from Austin, TX where SXSW Interactive 2013 is now in full swing. Yes, it’s raining (not exactly what we were promised) but inside the Austin Convention Center it’s dry and incredibly interesting. In the coming days we will share with you some of the most innovative video technologies and trends that we see here in the festival.

Let’s start with OVEE, which has taken on one of the biggest challenge of online TV – making the online experience truly social. In the case of OVEE, it was PBS that wanted to create a digital version of their community screenings, where people come together in different cities to watch and discuss PBS programming.

The result of this initiative is OVEE, which was financed by PBS (and therefore by the American tax-payers) and cost about 1.5 million to date. With OVEE one can quickly setup group screenings, share the link with others and then chat, show polls and use webcam streams to create a true social experience. Theoretically, the OVEE platform could be linked to any video stream (e.g. from Kaltura or YouTube), although for now it is only available for PBS programming.

You can see exactly how OVEE works in this short interview with Dennis Palmieri, Director of Innovation & Media Strategies, ITVS Independent Television Service. Stay tuned for more SXSW 2013 coverage!